5 Best Home Fire Fighting Pump Kits

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Our Favorite – NorthStar High-Pressure Water Pump with Honda GX160 Engine


The Honda brand backs this pump, while the Northstar brand explicitly promote it as being for remote firefighting purposes. It comes with standard NPT threads on its 2 inch diameter hose port. It is designed to optimize distance and height of discharge.

When buying a firefighter pump, we like to look for one that has strong and powerful pressure. Most water pumps are designed to move large quantities of water as transfer pumps but do not have requisite pressure for firefighting.

But in this review, we’ll outline a few water pumps on the market today and identify the ones we feel would be fit for us and our personal circumstances. They might not be right for you, so do your own research and make sure it’s the right fit.

For us, the best firefighting pumps we could find online that were worth considering were:

  • NorthStar High-Pressure Water Pump with Honda GX160 Engine
  • Koshin SEH-40H Centrifugal Fire Fighting Pump, 1.5″
  • Honda – General Purpose 2-Inch Centrifugal Water Pump
  • DuroMax XP702HP
  • DuroMax XP650WP

Best Fire Fighting Pumps

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Fire Fighting Pump

Quick Review

Our Rating

1. NorthStar High-Pressure Water Pump with Honda GX160 Engine This pump aims to increase flow rate without compromising too much pressure. We feel this is a good all-round pump for both water transfer and firefighting on our property. (Check Today’s Price on Amazon)

9/10

2. Koshin SEH-40H Centrifugal Fire Fighting Pump, 1.5″ This pump’s a small and lightweight package designed specifically for fire fighting. Unfortunately it doesn’t come with a roll cage. You’ll need a plan for affixing it to a solid surface near a water supply if you choose this one. (Check Today’s Price on Amazon)

8.5/10

3. DuroMax XP702HP The DuroMax XP702HP is promoted as a transfer pump primarily, but also has impressive specs in terms of max. head and pressure, meaning it could be transfered to a firefighting pump with the help of a professional. (Check Today’s Price on Amazon)

8/10

4. Honda – General Purpose 2-Inch Centrifugal Water Pump While this one comes with a great Honda brand motor, it’s ‘general purpose’ and may require professional modifications such as the use of a specialist fire fighting nozzle to use with fires.  (Check Today’s Price on Amazon)

7.5/10

5. DuroMax XP650WP A cheap and effective transfer pump, but the pressure is not as great as I’d like. I’d prefer a pump with better power and stronger pressure to protect my family from oncoming fires. (Check Today’s Price on Amazon)

7/10

1. NorthStar High-Pressure Water Pump with Honda GX160 Engine

Quick Review: This pump aims to increase flow rate without compromising too much pressure. We feel this is a good all-round pump if you want one for both water transfer and firefighting.


Northstar has produced an intriguing, high-pressure pump designed and promoted for both water transfer and firefighting. With a strong GX160 Honda motor, this model is designed specifically to shift water high and a long distance. It comes with a roll cage to help you to keep it steady while at work, and is surprisingly lighter than we’d expect, allowing users to move it around more easily.

The 2 Inch suction and discharge ports use standard NPT threads. Users need to have a 2 Inch suction and a 2 Inch discharge hose to get started with this model (check the specs and requirements on the manufacturer’s page).

Specs:

  • Max Head: 214 feet / 65 meters
  • Max Pressure: 94 PSI
  • Suction Port Size: 2 inches
  • Discharge Port Size: 2 inches
  • Flow rate: 8120 GPH
  • Engine Brand: Honda
  • Weight: 60 pounds
  • Fuel Capacity: 0.94 Gallons
  • Run Time: 2 – 2.5 hours
  • Discharge and Suction Hoses: Not included. Discharge and suction hoses sold separately.

Pros

Cons

Engine quality. Honda has a strong brand reputation which indicates good quality.Weight. Comparatively lightweight, coming in at 60 pounds.

Very high flow rate. At 8120 gallons per hour, this pump can move a lot of water.

Price. The extra price likely reflects the fact consumers are getting the trust of the Honda brand motor.

2. Koshin SEH-40H Centrifugal Fire Fighting Pump, 1.5″

Quick Review: This pump’s a small and lightweight package designed specifically for fire fighting. Unfortunately it doesn’t come with a roll cage. Users will need a plan for affixing it to a solid surface near a water supply.


Designed specifically for fire fighting, the Koshin SEH-40H is a lightweight option that could conceivably be fixed to the back of a custom-built trailer so you can get it to and from a water source. The one major downside of this one is that it doesn’t come with a roll cage. We’d be more comfortable with making a purchase of this one if it had a roll cage included.

If you choose this pump, you’ll need to buy a 1.5 Inch suction hose and a 1.5 Inch discharge hose. (Check the specs and requirements on the manufacturer’s page.)

Specs:

  • Max Head: 141 feet / 43 meters
  • Max Pressure: 80 PSI
  • Suction Port Size: 1.5 inches
  • Discharge Port Size: 1.5 inches
  • Flow rate: 4380 GPH
  • Engine Brand: Honda
  • Weight: 25 pounds
  • Fuel Capacity: 0.77 Gallon
  • Run Time: 2 hours
  • Discharge and Suction Hoses: Not included. Discharge and suction hoses sold separately.

Pros

Cons

Engine quality. High quality Honda brand pump.Competitively priced. It’s comparatively affordable, but you don’t get the roll cage either.

Decent flow rate. The flow rate exceeds that of some high rated popular pumps.

Light weight. At 25 pounds, this is the lightest pump on the list.

No Roll Cage. A roll cage is necessary for easily transporting the pump and holding it securely in place wherever you are. Lack of roll cage was a deal breaker for us.Pressure. The pressure is lower than we’d like, with a max. head of only 141 feet / 43 meters and max. PSI of only 80.

Low Fuel Capacity. The low 0.77 gallon fuel capacity may decrease run time.

3. DuroMax XP702HP

Quick Review: The DuroMax XP702HP is promoted as a transfer pump primarily, but also has impressive specs in terms of max. head and pressure, meaning it could be transfered to a firefighting pump with the help of a professional.


While this pump is not sold as a firefighting pump, we strongly considered it given its strong specs. It has a very good max head and max pressure, as well as a nice 1.5 Inch discharge port which is a size we’re familiar with and like for maintaining a balance between pressure and flow. Overall, we do like this model, but would want more professional input before taking the leap and choosing this one given that it’s not specifically sold and promoted as a fire fighting pump.

If you choose this pump, you’ll need to buy a 2 inch suction hose and a 1.5 or 2 inch discharge hose (check the specs and requirements on the manufacturer’s page).

Specs:

  • Max Head: 250 feet / 75 meters
  • Max Pressure: 116 PSI
  • Suction Port Size: 2 inches
  • Discharge Port Size: Both 1.5 and 2 inch ports
  • Flow rate: 4200 GPH
  • Weight: 55 pounds
  • Fuel Capacity: 0.95 Gallons
  • Run Time: 2.4 hours
  • Discharge and Suction Hoses: Not included. Discharge and suction hoses sold separately.

Pros

Cons

Very well priced. Best value for money we could find.High pressure (max. head 250ft). This means you should be able to get some strong water flow from it.

Our Preferred Sized hose Diameter (1.5 inches). This is the sweet spot for hose diameter for a home firefighting kit in our opinion. It helps with balancing strong pressure and high water flow.

Doesn’t come with hoses. You’ll need to buy a discharge hose and suction hose separately.Engine Brand. The engine is not a well known to us.

4. Honda – General Purpose 2-Inch Centrifugal Water Pump

Quick Review: While this one comes with a great Honda brand motor, it’s ‘general purpose’ and may require modifications such as the use of a specialist fire fighting nozzle to use with fires.


This pump is a general Honda pump which comes backed by Honda’s strong reputation. Unlike the first two on this list, this one and the Duromax below are not specifically branded as firefighting pumps, which gives us pause. Nonetheless, we have read reviews online that state people have used them for firefighting when using the correct hose and nozzle combination.

You will notice in the Specs below that the max pressure and max head are somewhat lower than the models above, which is why we chose to rate this one a little lower on our list – while it suits a general purpose water transfer pump purpose, and my be used in fires at a stretch, we’d prefer to go with a model that is branded, sold and promoted as a dedicated firefighting option.

Specs:

  • Max Head: 105 feet
  • Max Pressure: 45 PSI
  • Suction Port Size: 2 inches
  • Discharge Port Size: 2 inches
  • Flow rate: 164 GPM
  • Engine Brand: Honda
  • Weight: 46 pounds
  • Fuel Capacity: 0.5 Gallon
  • Discharge and Suction Hoses: Not included. Discharge and suction hoses sold separately.

Pros

Cons

Top Brand. We like the reputation and name of Honda, so we implicitly trust their pumps.Warranty. The 3 year consumer warranty also gives us confidence. Not Designed for Fires Specifically. While it would probably be much more effective than a garden hose, we’d prefer to go with a model sold as a firefighting option.

5. DuroMax XP650WP

Quick Review: A cheap transfer pump, but the pressure is not as great as most people would like for fire fighting. I’d prefer a pump with better power and stronger pressure to protect my family from oncoming fires.


This pump is attractive for being affordable, but people may be concerned by the fact this is more geared toward being a transfer pump than a high pressure fire fighting pump. It may get you by in a pinch. My father is a huge fan of the Honda models, and he suggested I stick to a Honda-designed motor, so I chose to give this one a pass. Nonetheless, for the right purposes and right person, this might be an appealing low cost option – you might want to consult a professional about this one.

If you choose this pump, you’ll need to buy a suction hose and a discharge hose compatible with the 3-Inch ports.

Specs:

  • Max Head: 117 feet / 35 meters
  • Max Pressure: 50 PSI
  • Suction Port Size: 3 inches
  • Discharge Port Size: 3 inches
  • Flow rate: 13,200 GPH
  • Weight: 65 pounds
  • Fuel Capacity: 1 Gallon
  • Run Time: 2.4 ours
  • Discharge and Suction Hoses: Not included. Discharge and suction hoses sold separately.

Pros

Cons

Flow speed. High water transfer rate which is great for dealing with flooding.Competitively priced. It’s one of the cheapest options out there.

Run time. Respectable 2.5 hour run time.

Low Pressure. I felt that with max. head of only 35 meters and a wide discharge hose diameter of 3 inches, it wouldn’t fit my firefighting needs. It’s more useful as a transfer pump than a firefighting pump.No hoses. Discharge and suction hoses sold separately.

Engine. The engine is not a well known brand.

What we Looked for in a Fire Fighting Pump

High Maximum head. This is a measure of how powerful the engine is for pulling water from the source and shooting it at the fire at high pressure and from a distance.

High PSI. We want pressure so we can get the water spraying long distances.

High Flow Rate. This is the quantity of water that gets shot out the end of the hose. You’ll want high flow, but remember not to compromise pressure (maximum head) to achieve this.

Fuel Type. 4 stroke Gasoline (Petrol). Believe it or not, there are still some 2-stroke pumps on sale out there. Avoid them! All the pumps in this list are 4-stroke engines that take regular gasoline straight from the Gas Station.

Engine Brand. Honda and Briggs-Stratton are the big engine brands in the industry, but you’ll pay for the quality.

What we Avoided in our Search

Pumps labelled ‘Transfer Pump’. A transfer pump is designed to move large amounts of water quickly. They move a lot of water through hoses of wider diameters, but they sacrifice pressure. You’ll want a pump optimized for pressure so that you can fight those fires!

What Else You’ll Need when Buying your own Pump

Quick Facts: “Make sure you set aside at least$150 – $200 to buy a suction and discharge hose when you buy your pump. If you want the whole kit in one, get the high-quality Endurance Pump Kit.”

The pump itself. The big bit of machinery at the heart of it all – and what this article reviews!

Suction hose. This is the hose you drop into your water source to suck up the water. It’ll be attached at the back end of the pump. Make sure it fits the suction port diameter of your pump. Note that the suction port diameter and the discharge port diameter are not always the same. Only the Endurance Pump in this review (Pump #2 above) comes with a suction hose.

Discharge hose. This is the hose you hold and aim! It’ll need to be long so you can access the fire. Make sure its diameter matches the diameter of your pump’s discharge port. Only the Endurance Pump in this review (Pump #2 above) comes with a discharge hose.

A water source. You can’t attach a water pump to a tap or drainpipe. You’ll need a source like a pool, dam, lake, or large water tank. You drop the suction hose (see below) in the water source when operating the pump.
Roll cage. This is the structure around the pump that holds it firm and in place while in use. Most pumps come with a roll cage. Note that the Koshin pump in this review does not come with a Roll Cage. All else do.

Glossary of Key Terms

Maximum Head

Quick Takeaway: “Look for a pump with a high maximum head.”

Maximum head is the maximum distance the pump can suck water up.

Imagine you needed to pump water out of a well that is 30 meters deep. You’d need a pump with a maximum head of more than 30 meters to get the water out of the well. But, a pump with a max. head of just 30m will lose a lot if its power sucking the water up and have no more power to shoot the water at high pressure toward the fire!

In other words, the harder it is to get water from the source, the lower the hose pressure will be.

So you need a pretty high maximum head to have an effective firefighting pump.

Pressure

Quick Takeaway: “I look for a pump with either max. PSI100 and above or maximum head of 70 meters or above.”

Firefighting pumps and hoses need high pressure. This is what makes them so effective compared to, say, a garden hose.

In my opinion, the ideal “maximum pressure” for a fire fighting pump is 100PSI or above.

The reason we’re talking maximum pressure here is that the PSI will be affected by how hard the pump has to work to get the water from the source to the fire. If you are pumping water uphill, the actual PSI will fall significantly.

If you can’t find a maximim PSI measure on the pump specs, use the maximum head measure instead. A high max. head implies the pump has the power for high pressure pumping. Aim for a pump with a maximum head of 70 meters or more to ensure high pressure.

You don’t want to be putting out a fire using a garden hose. It’d never pump out enough water at enough speed to save your home. A garden hose pressure is about 30-40PSI.

So, you’d be getting at least TRIPPLE the pressure and power using your specialized pump.

Discharge Hose

Quick Takeaway: “Most pumps don’t come with an included discharge hose. Make sure you buy a discharge hose that’s the same diameter as your pump’s discharge port.”

The discharge hose is the hose you’ll be holding when you fight the fire. You’ll need to screw this hose into the pump. Most pumps come with a regular thread system and are measured in sizes: 1 inch, 1.5 inches, 2 inches, 3 inches.

I like a discharge hose size of 1.5 inches. I find this hose diameter is wide enough to get a good flow rate, but thin enough to not compromise pressure.

Unfortunately most pumps don’t actually come with a hose. If you want the full kit in one purchase, get the Endurance Marine Self-Priming Firefighting System.

Discharge Port

Quick Takeaway: “As a general rule, a thinner discharge port will increase pressure, a thicker one will increase flow rate.”

The discharge port is the spot where you connect the discharge hose to the pump. Fortunately ports use a pretty regular thread system (NPT, usually) so you can buy a hose from any number of different brands.

You’ll need to make sure the diameter of the discharge hose you buy matches the diameter of the discharge port.

If you find a home-use portable pump with a discharge port size of 3 inches, you’re probably looking at a transfer pump which is optimized for addressing flooding, not fighting fires.

Suction Hose

Quick Takeaway: “Most pumps don’t come with an included suction hose. Make sure you buy a suction hose that’s the same diameter as your pump’s suction port.”

The suction hose is the hose you drop into your water source. The pump will suck water up through this hose. The hose connects to the back of the pump using a regular thread system. You’ll find when you drop the suction hose into the water it’ll probably float. Don’t worry – when you turn the pump on, that’ll be fixed!

Make sure you buy a suction hose that is the same diameter as your pump’s suction port.

Suction Port

Quick Takeaway: “The suction port size is not necessarily the same size as the discharge port. Make sure you check the suction port size and buy a suction hose of the same diameter.”

The suction port is the spot on the pump where you connect the suction hose to the pump. Be aware that the suction port and discharge port sizes on pumps are often not the same. The suction port is often wider. So, check the size of the suction port before buying your suction hose.

Flow Rate

Quick Takeaway: “Flow rate is important, but don’t compromise pressure (measured by maximum head). Aim for a flow rate above 3600GPH, but also a maximum head over 213 feet (65 meters).”

The flow rate is how much and how fast you can move the water. It is usually measured in gallons per hour or gallons per minute.

Transfer pumps (usually used for addressing flooded buildings) try to maximize flow rate by having wider suction and discharge port diameters. This can compromise water pressure, which is needed for shooting water at a fire.

So, keep an eye on the flow rate and try to find a pump with a flow rate of at least 3600 GPH (gallons per hour). However, check to make sure the maximum head is above 65 meters (213 feet) so the pressure is sufficient for fire fighting.

Final Thoughts

As summers get hotter and drier, wildfires are getting more and more ferocious. In 2019, fires ravaged California and the west coast of North America. They’ve also recently ripped through the east coast of Australia.

We have an obligation to protect our families from the ravages of fires. At the center of that is the fire fighting pump, which can be the one thing that saves you, your family, and your home.

This article has shared our opinions for our circumstances only, and is based on our online research and does not constitute advice, professional or otherwise. Your circumstances or experiences will differ from ours. Make sure you do your own additional research and due diligence and adhere to the rules laid out in our terms and conditions and disclaimer.